fetching finches

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Available Babies & Blog

I adopt out birds according the the natural reproductve cycle and can only estimate the color and availability. I do offer a birth certificate, leg band and health guarantee. Please note every finch is hand fed from a very young age- If you are a show breeder and do not require them to be hand fed, the adoption fee is reduced as my expenses are greatly reduced. I am also open to 'finch trading' for supplies or specimens.

I also design custom enclosures, and modify your existing enclosures. For more information please contact [email protected]

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Availability Interuption

Posted by [email protected] on August 16, 2015 at 7:20 AM Comments comments (0)

I must apologize for the interuption of the availability of young. Our aviary has been swamped the last few months and all babies have been spoken for with the exception of 3 female creams and 2 lightback females (adult and ready for breeding-  as we were withholding for breeding stock).

We are awaiting 7 new clutches (6 eggs each) in the coming weeks. While some of these have been reserved, there are many still availble and I will be clear with updating from now on. I appologiz to anyone who was awaiting a new clutch.

*Hand feeding/taming upon request. All jumbo (show stock) unless listed.

New clutches:

BF+PHEAO (medium size- but beautiful young)

LB+FAWN

PENGUIN+ BB/FAWN

OB+FAWN (medium size- first pair, but champion hen)

DSilver + BF

INDIAN SILVERBILLS

SOCIETY (mixed variation)

Please email with any questions/comments as we are happy to assist,

Thank you

New Custom Enclosure- Arab Palace

Posted by [email protected] on May 14, 2015 at 2:15 AM Comments comments (0)

MIDDLE EASTERN ENCLOSURE

(perfect for those super tame finches you want in your living room)

 


Materials: Pine and wire

Dimensions: Total 36 inches long, 16 inches deep and 42 inches tall. Including the stand it is 6 ft 5 inches.

Main flight interior corridor 34 inches long, 16 inches deep and 22 inches tall (plus the open towers which are not in this measurement but utilized by the birds with perches and nest)

 

Considerations:

Have a sliding 'drawer' to collect waste with grates above

Open top to allow light

Food/water dishes are standing (in the middle of the enclosure) to help stop all the seed husks and there is a 'lip' to prevent seeds from flying out.

 

Final product:


SUMMER IS HERE! and studies were a huge sucess

Posted by [email protected] on May 14, 2015 at 1:30 AM Comments comments (0)

STUDIES WERE A HUGE SUCESS, WE HAVE AVAILBLE BABIES FOR ADOPTION

My most recent study was conducted on a series of pairs- where I used a Advanced Nutrition Protocol on the pairs 1 month prior to breeding and throughout the development of the young. The control group was raised soley by the parents on commcerial finch diet supplimented with multivitamin and egg food/sprouted seed.

 

Advanced nutrition comprises a wide scale manipulation of the diet to enhance development. The details are explained throughout this website, but generally: delivery of nutrients was changed for faster absorption, protein content was increased by 20% 1 month prior to breeding, and protein was also increased by 10% for the clutch as they developed. Key vitamin compounds were added, which included essential amino acids, A, E, trace minerals, iodine and B vitamins.

 

Overall the findings were overwhelmingly positive: This allows us to understand the importance of not only selective breeding for health and mass, but also for dietary needs.

 

 

Conclusion: Resulted in a average of 10% overall increase in bodyweight of the young. The fledglings had increase in feather density estimated at 22% and advanced developmental rates- such as balance and coordination including perching and flying, approximately 3 days ahead of other groups. They showed a expedited weaning ability and stronger song characteristics.

The second phase of the study will be taking place now. I am personally very excited to see the results. But in the meantime, so many birds have been born, and there are non-tame eurpopean finches avialable for adoption. For immediate adoption we have:

Cream

Fawn (one giant male)

Lightback

Phaeo

Blackbreasted Fawn

Penguin

We are looking to find homes for these birds as soon as possible to make room for the upcoming clutches. If interested please let me know as soon as possible and they can be photographed and delivered by curiour immediately.


I am also proud to announce we have multiple new clutches which should hatch in about 13 days. Very soon the babies that will be availble are:

Lightback

Cream

Silver (dominent dilute)

Blackface

Blackbreasted/Fawn

Penguin

If you want to preorder a hand fed bird, please let me know so I can reserve for you!



New Clutch: Ambrose & Angelica

Posted by [email protected] on February 14, 2015 at 7:00 PM Comments comments (0)

AMBROSE AND ANGELICA HAVE A NEW CLUTCH!

 

LINEAGE: AMBROSE, OB Phaeo cock, ANGELICA OBBB Fawn Hen (AM/AN, OBP+OBBBF 02 2015)

 Clutch size: 6

 Begin incubation: Feb 16th 2015

 Began Hatching: 1st of March, 2015

 

These are medium size (larger than normal- about 20 grams)

Currently 4 hatchlings are available for adoption.

The adoption fee for Fetching Finches Birds varies. Ready for families after they have weaned. If in UAE, home delivery by courier is availalable free of charge upon request. All babies will be hand fed, unless requested otherwise. For more information on pricing, please check back at a later date, or conact me with clutch code: LO/OM, F+LB 02 2015

 

If you are interested in adopting one or more of these remarkable birds, please contact me.

[email protected]

 

 

 

 

LONGINES & OMEGA- New Clutch

Posted by [email protected] on February 6, 2015 at 7:00 PM Comments comments (0)

 

LONGINES AND OMEGA HAVE A NEW CLUTCH!

LINEAGE: LONGINES, Fawn Hen & OMEGA, Lightback Cock. (LO/OM, F+LB 02 2015)

Clutch size: 7

Began incubation: Feb 4th 2015

Expected Hatch date: 17th - 19th of Feb, 2015

Currently 5 hatchlings are available for adoption (two are reserved to date).

This is entirely before schedule, but as soon as the two were placed together, there was copulation (within 24 hours).

The couple was still in quaratine, and now will have to remain there until the clutch flegdes!

Images of hatchlings will be available approximately 2 weeks from now, followed by regular updates on progress.


The adoption fee for Fetching Finches Birds varies. Ready for families after they have weaned. If in UAE, home delivery by courier is availalable free of charge upon request. All babies will be hand fed, unless requested otherwise. For more information on pricing, please check back at a later date, or conact me with clutch code: LO/OM, F+LB 02 2015

 

If you are interested in adopting one or more of these remarkable birds, please contact me.

[email protected]



Day of Arrival for your feathered friend

Posted by [email protected] on January 30, 2015 at 2:50 AM Comments comments (0)

BRINGING YOUR FINCH HOME

One of the most common question I recieve is 'What do I do when I get my finch home?'

First and foremost be prepared. Have your quarantine cage at the ready, make sure you have created a suitable enclosure for your new baby, and finally have food, water and supplies at the ready.


EXTRA RESOURCES:

Dehydration is one of the leading causes of death in these birds. Please provide extra water (even a small dish on the floor of the cage). Upon arrival I use a vitamin mix in the water, and a half dosage of rehydration liquid. If your bird starts to look dizzy, squints it eyes or hold its wings away from its body, it may be dehydrated. Try offer a syringe filled with rehydration liquid (like pedialyte) and dropping it on the side of their beak- Never try to force liquids, this can cause death.

If the bird is to be introduced into an existing enclosure, please read this other post on Integrating your new finch. Place cages adjacent to each other for a few days to let them get accustomed to each other, then place the new bird in the cage closer to sundown. This gives them ample time to seek out resources, and then during nightfall the birds will sleep. However do make sure to have a nightlight so the new bird can located food/water upon request.


HEALTH:

Birds often develop watery droppings after the stress of a move, do not be alarmed if this continues for the first 48 hours. Please note to color of the droppings as green can often indicate an infection. It is a good idea to administer a probiotic like AVIPRO AVIAN for 1 week. This will help your bird with digestion, assimilation to a new food, relieve stress and provide electrolytes.


PRIVACY:

Birds can becomes easily stressed, so try and disturb them as little as possible the first 24 hours. My birds are tame, and enjoy the company of others, but it is best to let them come to you rather than force interaction.

It generally takes 24 to 48 hours for them to become acclimated. However during this time, I keep vitamin water and special foods available to give them a boost in nutrition and speak softly to them.


LOVE:

 My hand raised finches will want attention, so please don’t completely abandon them. Make sure you are calm and friendly, giving many opportunities for interaction after the first 24 hours.

 



Loss of a finch

Posted by [email protected] on January 21, 2015 at 2:20 AM Comments comments (0)

LOSS:

Finches are extremely social beings and require interaction to maintain mental health. When one of your birds passes away- first you must determine the cause. It is beneficial to bring the specimen into the vet. Secondly; you need to consider the impact on his or her mate.


The mental anguish over losing a companion can often cause death in the remaining finch unless they are in an aviary with multiple other birds for companionship.


There was a massive storm that hit Dubai, complete with hail and lightening. I took drastic action moving everyone indoors, but unfortunately my female Alpha passed away today while incubating her clutch- the stress created by the severity of the storm and moving the enclosure deemed too much after laying a large clutch of 6. She has now left behind 6 eggs for her companion Omega to manage.


Im my experience, when the birds are kept in true pairs…. If one finch passes away, the remaining finch usually passes away within a weeks time from stress and depression.


PREVENT DEATH FROM PHYSICAL STRESS:

First I increase the heat (I use a space heater) to around 80 degrees

I add vitamins to the water, and larger quantiy of favorite foods are added to the enclosure (like millet) and items with gluclose like fresh fruit or Nestling Food (see mid down the page) and add small amount of honey.


PREVENT DEATH FROM MENTAL STRESS:

Being so social, the silence creates loneliness. Just hearing other finches uplifts the spirit of the finch. If you don’t have other finches- then find a video or sound bite of finches singing and play it for him/her.

Alternately and ideal. Purchase a replacement finch immediately. And place second finch in an adjacent enclosure for 2-3 days. After that time, please reposition items in the main cage, and then add in your new finch with dim lighting. Finches don’t have very good night vision, and when it becomes dark they immediately become calm. You could even place a towel over the cage if you are unable to dim the lights. I set up a web cam which can see in the dark so I am able to view them 24/7


INTEGRATING A NEW FINCH- TO SAVE YOUR FINCHES LIFE:

Once the new finch is in the enclosure- be sure to monitor them. If there are subtle signs of aggression this should subside in a weeks time:

Mounting: dominance behavior

Beaking: pecking at face (can be a problem if it continues)

Chasing: to chase one or another


Aggression should stop within the first week. If the aggression should escalate to plucking or any other type of physical damage you will need to separate the pair. You can try to reintroduce them again in a weeks time (leaving their cages next to each other).

Cohabitation: Positive is if the pair sits next to one another on a perch.


WHAT IF YOUR FINCHES WERE INCUBATING?

It is now the job of the remaining finch to raise the young- there are three main issues with this:

*I immediately increase the heat and humity, provide with an electrolyte solution (I use Darrows), and provide specialty foods.



 

If you are reading this- then you have more than likely experienced a loss. Unfortunately, I can only advise on the avian aspects. The consequence to the human brain can be devistating. My heart goes out to you.

ALPHA & OMEGA CLUTCH UPDATE: HATCHED!

Posted by [email protected] on January 17, 2015 at 7:00 PM Comments comments (1)

ALPHA AND OMEGA: UPDATE- Started Hatching on the 25th of January!

(A/O, BB+LB 01 2015)

  

Omega was working diligently to protect the new clutch while mom stretches her legs. I was very excited to know we would have a wonderful strong clutch. However we had record breaking storms a few days ago. The hail and lightning cause severe damage and spooked Alpha off the nest. She was so scared she refused to eat and passed away shortly after the storm. Omega worked hard to sit on the eggs, but his depression from the loss of his companion caused him to abandon the nest.

Periodic cooling of bird eggs reduces embryonic growth efficiency.


The eggs were removed, and placed in a brooder. This morning, 2 hatched. Because there is no parent for them, I will be handfeeding them from day 1- which is a very delicate process and I need to be feeding every hour on the hour and trying to maintain a proper temp and humidity.


In a few days I will try to create a foster family to care for the nestlings. We are praying they make it through.

 



While Lightback (LB) is not an extremely rare variety, the Black Breasted is sought after by many.

It is said the Black Breasted is like pepper- and adds a wonderful flavor to any combination. This clutch should produce multiple rare mutations which are suitable for competition, so if you are interested in a visible black breasted, now is the time to reserve a chick provided they survive. Roy Beckham has a great photo of a LB/BB finch:


Source; efinch is an amazing site, and they also have a beautiful facebook page: www.efinch.com/species/bbzeb.htm


 

Alpha & Omega- New Clutch

Posted by [email protected] on January 14, 2015 at 5:45 AM Comments comments (0)

ALPHA AND OMEGA HAVE A NEW CLUTCH!

LINEAGE: ALPHA, Black Breasted Hen & OMEGA, Lightback Cock. (A/O, BB+LB 01 2015)

Clutch size: 6

Expected Hatch date:  21st - 24th of January.

Currently 5 nestlings are available for adoption (one is reserved to date).

Images of nestlings will be available approximately 2 weeks from now. Ready for families after they have weaned and will be approximately available for delivery in mid march. If in UAE, home delivery by courier is availalable upon request.


The adoption fee for Fetching Finches Birds varies. For more information on pricing, please check back at a later date, or conact me with clutch code: A/O, BB+LB

If you are interested in adopting one or more of these remarkable birds, please contact me to flll out an application.

[email protected]


Introduction of a New Bird

Posted by [email protected] on January 14, 2015 at 5:00 AM Comments comments (0)

Consider thee steps when integrating a new finch into an existing community:

Zebs make up for their small stature by being slightly territorial (yet at the same time social) and work well in community cages provided their is ample space. Introducing a new bird to the community can disturb the social order and the new bird can be met with aggression. There are a few steps to prevent this:


1. BUDDY SYSTEM: It is good practice to introduce new birds in pairs if possible.


2. INTORDUCTION BEFORE ORIENTATION. Place the new bird(s) in a small cage next to the large cage so they may become accustomed to eachother for 3 days.


My birds leave the aviary healthy, but could be exposed to disease upon travel (especially internationally). Quarantine can be as simple as leaving the birds in a separate cage for 2-4 weeks before integration. Under this time in a separate enclosure, I add in suppliments and medication if needed. Having the bird initially separated also reduces stress.

 

3. REPOSTITION ITEMS in the cage (nests, perches, etc), so they can define new territories.


4. INCREASE RESOURCES. Provide an extra seed container, extra spray of millet on opposite sides of the cage, and add a variety of things to peck and chew: a big leaf of lettuce, palm fronds or new fruit choices (served in half on the bottom of the cage to devour).


5. BEHAVIOR: It is to be expected that there be a slight anamosity amongst the group in the beginning, but it should subside within a few days.My birds are known to have a flawless integration as they have been bred to understand and work well with other species and environments.

Once the new finch is in the enclosure- be sure to monitor them. If there are subtle signs of aggression this should subside in a weeks time:

 

Mounting: dominance behavior

 

Beaking: pecking at face (can be a problem if it continues)

 

Chasing: to chase one or another

 

Aggression should stop within the first week. If the aggression should escalate to plucking or any other type of physical damage you will need to separate the pair. You can try to reintroduce them again in a weeks time (leaving their cages next to each other).

 

Cohabitation: Positive is if the pair sits next to one another on a perch.

 

 


If aggression does not resolve iteself, or is causing harm to one or more of the birds, the aggressor should be removed from the enclosure and place in a quarentine cage. You should try an integrate the aggressor after 5 days time (without repositioning cage elements) as this changes the 'pecking order' and will allow cohabitation.

If you are integrating a different breed of finches (zebras and javas, or societies and zebras) the same rules apply.


 




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